Muzzleloading Forum
 
HomeGalleryFAQSearchRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1, 2
AuthorMessage
patocazador
Site
Site
avatar

Number of posts : 4959
Age : 74
Location : central Florida
Registration date : 2012-08-22

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   April 21st 2016, 9:28 am

@Sharpsman wrote:
Use this:

http://www.corrosionx.com/aviation.html

OUCH! Minimum shipping fee= $17 (for a $7 item). scratch

_________________
Bob

"My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government." -Thomas Jefferson
Back to top Go down
View user profile
AZshooter



Number of posts : 68
Age : 64
Location : Arizona Territory
Registration date : 2015-05-30

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   June 21st 2016, 1:50 am

@Sharpsman wrote:
Some very knowledgeable folks that have been in business over 100 years don't recommend hot water because it opens up the pores of the metal and promotes rusting! They recommend only 'tepid' water!
100 years ago, many barrels were made of iron, which did have a 'porous' grain structure.  Modern steel barrels don't have pores. 

Hot water evaporates quicker, and minimizes the likelihood of rusting. If you have a problem with flash rusting when using hot water, it's the minerals in your water & not the hot water itself that does that.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
lighthorseman

avatar

Male Number of posts : 713
Age : 63
Location : Harrison Idaho
Registration date : 2016-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   June 21st 2016, 11:19 am

A friend and long time gun builder recommended using windshield wiper fluid as my solvent. I already had one of those clamps you attach to the touch hole once the lock is removed, which has a long rubber tube that goes down into the bottle of wiper fluid. This has worked well enough that I have dispensed with soapy water as I had done for so many years.......however either one works and soapy water is cheaper, though I have used the same wiper fluid readily because all the heavy residue sinks to the bottom. I assume there is alcohol in the solution.

_________________
Doug
Christian Outdoor Leadership Training
Pathfinder Adventures


One page of history is worth more than a book of logic
Back to top Go down
View user profile
AZshooter



Number of posts : 68
Age : 64
Location : Arizona Territory
Registration date : 2015-05-30

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   June 21st 2016, 6:05 pm

@lighthorseman wrote:
A friend and long time gun builder recommended using windshield wiper fluid as my solvent. I already had one of those clamps you attach to the touch hole once the lock is removed, which has a long rubber tube that goes down into the bottle of wiper fluid. This has worked well enough that I have dispensed with soapy water as I had done for so many years.......however either one works and soapy water is cheaper, though I have used the same wiper fluid readily because all the heavy residue sinks to the bottom. I assume there is alcohol in the solution.
The heavy residue isn't the problem, the corrosive salts dissolved into the liquid IS.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
lighthorseman

avatar

Male Number of posts : 713
Age : 63
Location : Harrison Idaho
Registration date : 2016-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   June 21st 2016, 6:36 pm

good point!

_________________
Doug
Christian Outdoor Leadership Training
Pathfinder Adventures


One page of history is worth more than a book of logic
Back to top Go down
View user profile
rfd

avatar

Male Number of posts : 23
Age : 71
Location : Nor'East
Registration date : 2016-08-09

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 9th 2016, 6:46 am

nope - please, no hot water, no soapy water - i wouldn't do that to any iron what requires "seasoning", be it muzzleloader or skillet pan.  just use what's always been used to work efficiently well and quickly - plain ol' air temperature water.

first, put the lock on half cock and remove it, remove the flint or nipple, stick the lock in a pot of tepid tap water and leave it be. 

if the barrel is wedged on with a hooked breech, remove the barrel and stick the chamber end into a bucket of PLAIN water, run a patched jag up 'n' down the tube 'til the water jetting outta the touch hole or bolster looks reasonably clean.  out of the barrel, run dry patches down the tube and if they're reasonably clean - it will never be and should never be perfectly clean because we don't wanna remove any "seasoning" oils that are in the molecular pores of the barrel iron.  run a down a patch that's wet with any kinda lube - wd40, lehigh valley, smokeless clp, moose milk, bore butter, whatever, don't much matter since the bad krap is dissolved and out.

scrub the lock with a brush (tooth or hand or whatever), when reasonably clean pat dry the water with towel, paper or cloth.  spray the lock with something good like wd40, pat off any excess.

clean out any bp residue in the barrel channel, lock inlet, breech tang with a water moist cloth, dry off.

wipe down the entire barrel with a barely oily damp cloth, put the the barrel back, put the lock back, put back the flint or nipple. 

IF the barrel is pinned, leave it in the stock, plug the touch hole or nipple with a round toothpick, fill the barrel with tepid water and let stand whilst working on cleaning the lock.  when the lock is cleaned and lubed, dump out the barrel water, with the touch hole or nipple pointed down run water wet patched jags down the tube until they come out reasonably clean.

i'll add - it pays to at least use anti-seize lube on a nipple or vent liner.  if yer gun allows, and most of the offshore guns will NOT, remove the breech (offshore breeches are notoriously of the patent ilk) and anti-seize lube it.  you will NOT be able to remove breeches on traditions, cva, and pedersoli barrels without destroying them (at least traditions actually states that).  investarms (lyman, cabelas, dgw) breeches can be removed with a special $20 breech plug socket and a big ol' pipe wrench.  why remove the breech plug?  well, no real need until you dry ball and can't either blow it out with air (caplock) or powder, or pull it out with a screw worm.

as always, YMMV.  Cool
Back to top Go down
View user profile
AZshooter



Number of posts : 68
Age : 64
Location : Arizona Territory
Registration date : 2015-05-30

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 9th 2016, 6:51 pm

One of the biggest fallacies perpetrated today, usually by bore lube, cleaning and 'conditioning' manufacturers pertains to those mythical microscopic "pores" in your barrel.  While this was true in the days of iron barrels, (and if you happen to have an iron Douglas barrel). Barrels in use today are steel, and not porous like your old cast skillet. None of my steel barrels contain pores; none of yours do, either.

You can season an iron skillet - this involves building up a layer of varnish that forms an impervious and non-stick finish.  You don't want varnish in your rifle barrel.  Steel barrels perform best when clean - without residual fouling, leading or varnish.  HOT water will facilitate removal of any nasty commercially made patch or ball lubes, as well as more traditional beeswax and tallow blends.  

You don't want to use hot, soapy water to clean your iron skillet; you DO want to use it to clean your steel barrel.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
rfd

avatar

Male Number of posts : 23
Age : 71
Location : Nor'East
Registration date : 2016-08-09

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 9th 2016, 7:34 pm

to each their own, it's all good if it works good. Cool

_________________


NMLRA - NRA - NRA/RSO -  Buffalo Rifles - Trad Gang
Back to top Go down
View user profile
FrontierGander
Admin
avatar

Male Number of posts : 14277
Age : 33
Location : Boncarbo,Colorado
Registration date : 2008-05-19

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 9th 2016, 8:13 pm

No Such thing as seasoning unless its fouling left in the rifling thats considered seasoning 😄
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.frontiermuzzleloading.com
Sharpsman

avatar

Male Number of posts : 439
Age : 77
Location : Clear Lake, Louisiana
Registration date : 2016-02-13

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 9th 2016, 9:28 pm

I like to 'season' them like onto this: cheers Laughing

Hawken Flintlock Rifle by Rick Mulhern, on Flickr
Back to top Go down
View user profile
lighthorseman

avatar

Male Number of posts : 713
Age : 63
Location : Harrison Idaho
Registration date : 2016-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 9th 2016, 10:45 pm

That would drop, bout anything in North America! t up

_________________
Doug
Christian Outdoor Leadership Training
Pathfinder Adventures


One page of history is worth more than a book of logic
Back to top Go down
View user profile
rfd

avatar

Male Number of posts : 23
Age : 71
Location : Nor'East
Registration date : 2016-08-09

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 10th 2016, 3:48 am

Do as you like and think best, and that will at least be best for ... you.

However ... there are shooters and gunsmiths who would argue against hot water, soap, and other nasties going down the tube.  Acclaimed gunsmith Peter A. Alexander has written in his excellent treatise tome on gunmaking the following with regards to cleaning iron/steel barrels ...

 

_________________


NMLRA - NRA - NRA/RSO -  Buffalo Rifles - Trad Gang
Back to top Go down
View user profile
FrontierGander
Admin
avatar

Male Number of posts : 14277
Age : 33
Location : Boncarbo,Colorado
Registration date : 2008-05-19

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 10th 2016, 5:55 pm

He made the mistake of saying "Its just like seasoning a cast iron pan"

One dry patch in my rifles = A bore still full of water and I darn sure won't trust WD40 for keeping rust away, after a freshly turned crank shaft had to be thrown away after being sprayed with with wd40.

The best advice is to do what you do and what works.

Hot soapy water, followed up by another bucket of clean water, a couple dry patches and either alcohol or gun scrubber down the bore to help dry the face of the breech plug and drum, then a couple more dry patches and its done. Some times I'll even use 2 in 1 Bore Scrubber after the alcohol if I know I'll be shooting the next day.

This is why I make Shoot Out! So those guys that abused their rifles by not cleaning them, can get them cleaned up and shooting right again without a bore full of pits. Of course, some are to far gone by that time.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.frontiermuzzleloading.com
rfd

avatar

Male Number of posts : 23
Age : 71
Location : Nor'East
Registration date : 2016-08-09

PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   August 10th 2016, 6:15 pm

there ya go, podner = "do what you do and what works" best for you. to each their own and diverse thinking is the spice of life. 

peter has been in the trad ml game for many decades and he knows whereof he speaketh.  so do his gunmaker compadres.  i'm no gunmaker, but i've had bp blackened hands since the mid 50's and have used every "cleaning" concoction i'd found or been advised to use for chasing the after-shoot residue in the tube, lock and furniture.  i have seen the light, straight up water is all i need.  yer mileage doth vary and that's cool by me.

_________________


NMLRA - NRA - NRA/RSO -  Buffalo Rifles - Trad Gang
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader   

Back to top Go down
 
Cleaning your Traditional Muzzleloader
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 2 of 2Go to page : Previous  1, 2

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Frontier Muzzleloading :: Muzzleloading Topic :: Traditional Muzzleloading :: Traditional Hunter Misc.-
Jump to: