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 antique store score!!!

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FrontierGander
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PostSubject: antique store score!!!   February 10th 2018, 6:50 pm

Scored today at an antique store!! First I found a couple good books, then I scored a skinner knife similar to a green river knife, then I found a plain leather vest for $5!! I already repaired one small tear and a loose seam. It will look great with my mountain man work shirts. It has a couple small pockets so I may pop the stitching and remove them. Turned out to be a great vest, nice dark, aged color.
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Marty
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 11th 2018, 7:42 am

Sounds like a nice addition to your attire.  Leather always seems to look better once it's well, broken-in.
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FrontierGander
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 13th 2018, 3:44 pm

Here are some pics of the vest and knife. I just added a mule deer antler button from a shed I found some years ago. I like those knobby bases, they make attractive buttons. Simple leather loop goes around the button to hold the vest closed.

The two exposed leather pieces that hanging down, I will add a few beads to each once I buy some.

What do you think about the pockets? I don't expect it to be 100% PC, which its not, but I actually have some uses for those pockets with the rotating capper Stony made me.

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strong eagle



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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 13th 2018, 4:37 pm

also look for very cheap 1800/straight razors. they make the best cutting edges for cutting patches off at the muzzle there is. i never pay more than 10 dollars for mine. a patch cut off at the muzzle is much more accurate than a precut patch.
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FrontierGander
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 13th 2018, 4:46 pm

Ahhhh good idea! Save my hunting knife that's for sure.
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strong eagle



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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 13th 2018, 7:01 pm

i drill a hole in the handle and then hang them around my neck with a leather cord or nice braided cord so they are right there when i want to cut a patch off.
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MattRaymond



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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 14th 2018, 7:51 am

Keep the pockets...they look fine and will probably look odd if you remove them. Add to horn buttons to each one and it will look like they belong there and will match the main button.
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 14th 2018, 1:26 pm





Its very comfortable and I like it a lot. Room in the pocket for my ball block, and the other pocket holds my capper that Stony made for me.
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Marty
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 15th 2018, 6:48 am

Great color scheme with those duds! I really like the contrast the Vest creates.:rtup
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Buck Conner
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   February 20th 2018, 3:01 pm

@FrontierGander wrote:
What do you think about the pockets? I don't expect it to be 100% PC, which its not, but I actually have some uses for those pockets with the rotating capper Stony made me.

To make the pockets look more to your liking (older) remove the factory stitching and restitch with a loop style stitch by hand. This will hide the machine stitching holes Jon.

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DJ



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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   March 27th 2018, 3:13 pm

Doing the dress up thing in our hobby can be expensive. So when ever we can find a deal at a thrift store or antique shop its always fun. I like the vest it looks very authentic.

DJ
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Buck Conner
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   March 27th 2018, 4:43 pm

It all depends on how authentic your willing to go, in many circles even the number of stitches per inch is important. That's nothing to what is expected and approved by some groups. It's all about correctness, documentation for the time period your working on. Usually the highest ranking in these association tells you who has reached the top and who's an-also-ran. 

Sounds like a lot of expense which it is, for me its pride of doing it right. I'm an AMM (American Mountain Men) member "Hiverano Degree" that's as high as the ranking goes and an NAF (North American Frontiersmen) member "Mountaineer Degree" that too is at the top for ranking. Not bragging but proud I made it just like being an Eagle Scout like several on this list that they too are proud of what they worked for.

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Rick N Bama

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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   March 28th 2018, 4:13 pm

Well for some reason I've just found this thread.  If the Vest Pockets are useful then by all means leave them on.  It looks good and is a good match for your other clothing.

Now for a little Cotton Country history on your knife.  I grew up on a 2 Horse Cotton Farm here in N Alabama.  When we had picked enough to make a Bale (1500lbs raw to get a 500lb Bale) it was off to the Gin.  When the finished bale came out of the press it was wrapped in Burlap with steel bands holding the Burlap on and keeping the bale compressed.  A sample of Cotton had to be pulled from the Bale for grading and a knife just like yours was used to cut the burlap, hence the name for those knives was a "Sampling Knife" and were made by Old Hickory.  A Whetstone was kept with the knife as it normally needed a couple licks on the stone before every sample was taken.  I bought my son in law, who also grew up on a Cotton Farm, one several years ago from an EBay Dealer.
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NWTF Lobo

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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   March 28th 2018, 5:26 pm

Good score, it looks great on you.....keep the pockets they'll come in handy. 

The knife looks like it would make a good skinning knife :rtup
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Buck Conner
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PostSubject: Re: antique store score!!!   March 28th 2018, 6:49 pm

Quote :
Rick N BamaWell for some reason I've just found this thread.  If the Vest Pockets are useful then by all means leave them on.  It looks good and is a good match for your other clothing.

Now for a little Cotton Country history on your knife.  I grew up on a 2 Horse Cotton Farm here in N Alabama.  When we had picked enough to make a Bale (1500lbs raw to get a 500lb Bale) it was off to the Gin.  When the finished bale came out of the press it was wrapped in Burlap with steel bands holding the Burlap on and keeping the bale compressed.  A sample of Cotton had to be pulled from the Bale for grading and a knife just like yours was used to cut the burlap, hence the name for those knives was a "Sampling Knife" and were made by Old Hickory.  A Whetstone was kept with the knife as it normally needed a couple licks on the stone before every sample was taken.  I bought my son in law, who also grew up on a Cotton Farm, one several years ago from an EBay Dealer.

That knife was originally made by John Russell's Green River Company back during the buffalo hunters days, called a "Buffalo Skinner". When others saw how popular it was folks like Hickory and a few others copied the design and called it by different names. 

Here's a little history for you.

The Green River Knife – An Integral Part of the Legend of the Old West
As surprising as it may seem, at the end of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th, there was not a single knifemaker in all America, despite the large number of people swarming all over it, all over that is except for the West, which was still too wild to venture into. The few metalsmiths concentrated essentially on plowing implements, horseshoes and odd repairs, but rarely the manufacture of blades. It was thus logical for the colonizers to look to their countries of origin for all cutlery requirements. The principal supplier was England. Apart from folding knives and various all-purpose straight models produced in the purest Sheffield style. It soon became necessary to create specific shapes to meet the requirements encountered in the vast New World. One of these requirements was skinning animals to make clothes, and so it was that the I. Wilson firm designed one of the first “skinner” type knives in 1750.

In 1818, Henry Harrington established the first cutlery factory on the continent, followed in 1834, by John Russell, whose clientele was now much large that that of his predecessor. Descended from an old family of English pioneers, John Russell chose the banks of the Green River, near Greenfield, Massachusetts, to set up his first factory, to the great astonishment of his family and friends. Here his first products were cast steel socket chisels and axe heads followed. In fact, John did not have the slightest experience in this domain of cutlery, his first activity having been a silversmith, followed by cotton in Georgia, where he amassed a considerable fortune. In 1832, he made as trip back down memory lane to his birthplace and decided to set up home there and take early retirement.

The place was so devoid of activity, through, that his only escape from depression was to throw him into a new professional occupation. But why knifemaking? There was no tradition of it in the country and he himself had no knowledge of the craft. Unfortunately history cannot enlighten us. Perhaps he just said to himself, “Why Not?”

Successive failures, like the destruction of the factory on two occasions by fire and once by flooding of the Green River, and the great difficulty in finding qualified labor, did not discourage him in the slightest. He also produced wooden tools that he sold through his brother Francis, who had the idea of opening a shop in New York. So when the first series of long knives was launched, there was already an excellent sale outlet based there in the East, from which it spread out through the interior of the continent.

In 1846 Russell was joined in business by his brother Francis and an investor named Henry Clapp. The new factory they built was christened the “Green River Works” a trade name that would soon be carried on knives across America. The Russell’s developed several labor saving devices and introduced a steam engine to power much of their equipment. Their innovative ideas also included setting wages at a rate that lured skilled cutlery workers from Sheffield, England. In the late 1830’s Russell began to make what was called “An American Hunting Knife”.



This first series comprised of five models, all of which are still sold today! Carefully planned manufacturing methods ensured a very large production, with the nearby river providing hydraulic energy for the power hammers. The materials were also of the highest quality, originating from Sheffield. Of an extremely simple flatsole design with two riveted wooden plaques for the handle, they were also intended for particular use; skinning and cutting up animals. These included the “Buffalo Skinner” with its characteristic wide point that turns up, and the “Dadley Universal”, which was an early “utility” knife”. Boning knife; ”semi-skinner”, which was easier for cutting up and skinning medium game than its big brother (for bison essentially) and the “beef-skinner”, later called the “butcher” which had a long 20 cm blade for cutting up meat.



In 1868, a fire destroyed much of the Greenfield Factory and a new one was built in Turner Falls, Massachusetts. The John Russell Manufacturing Company’s new cutlery factory was the largest in the world and featured many conveniences not found in the company’s previous facilities. Nearly 500 employees worked there, but it was reported that the factory was large enough to employ over a thousand workmen. Although business was good, with sales volume near $750,000, the new factory had drained the company’s financial resources. The company went bankrupt in 1873 and reorganization took place soon thereafter, with no members of the John Russell family remaining as investors.

Manufacture of pocketknives began in 1875 and by 1877 Russell made over 400 different patterns and had sold over a half-million pieces. Similar in the fame earned by Russell’s Green River knives, another knife pattern’s name would become synonymous with that of its manufacture. A Sheffield cutler, Obadiah Barlow, had invented the first “Barlow” about 1667 but it was Russell who would make it America’s favorite for several decades. It became famous by selling for 15¢ and 25¢ for the one-blade and two-blade models, respectively. When the post World War I steel price increased dictated a price increase on Russell’s Barlow’s, consumers were unhappy and the company discontinued its manufacture in the early 1930’s.

In 1933, the John Russell Manufacturing Company merged with the Harrington Cutlery Company to become the Russell-Harrington Company and was moved to Southbridge, Massachusetts. When a popular Louisville Courier Journal columnist, Allen Trout, founded the Barlow Bobcats Club in the early 1950s. (A requirement was to own an original Russell Barlow), the company participated for a while in the knife’s renewed popularity by restoring Russell Barlow’s for $1.00. Factory restored knives can be identified by the word SECOND etched on the face of the blade.

In 2001, the company changed its name to Dexter Russell, Inc. Knife production today is primarily in kitchen and industrial cutlery, and pocketknives have not been made since about 1930. Another company, probably Schrade manufactured the 12,000 Russell Barlow Commemorative knives introduced by Dexter Russell Company in 1974, these had Delrin handles.  Beginning the late 1990’s, the company had both standard and daddy Barlow’s made for the firm by different manufacturers. These were offered with handles of genuine stag, sawcut green bone, and sawcut red bone. The bolsters were made of nickel silver.


Counterfeits of the standard 3 3/8 Russell Barlow’s were factory made in Germany for a time in the early 1970s. Handled in bone or black composition, the stamps look very much like the original stamps and the ink stamping that reads GERMANY is easily wiped away. Luckily, examining the end handle pin, the one furthest away from the bolster, easily identifies the fakes. If the pin is nearly centered across the width of the handle, the knife is likely original. If however, that pin is located very near the edge of the handle, the knife is a German counterfeit.

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