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 A question from Facebook user

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FrontierGander
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PostSubject: A question from Facebook user   April 2nd 2018, 10:48 am

Got this from a member on our facebook page.

hello. i had a question about the use of rifled muzzle loaders in warfare. i understand that rifles were slower to load than muskets due to the tight fit between the lead balls and the rifling and i was wondering if soldiers ever carried 2 different sizes of balls? the 1st set being the standard size allowing longer, accurate shots and the 2nd set would be undersized allowing faster reloads for when the enemy marched closer
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OldMtnMan

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PostSubject: Re: A question from Facebook user   April 2nd 2018, 10:51 am

I think in general they didn't use tight loads in war. Just so they could always get them down a fouled bore.

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PostSubject: Re: A question from Facebook user   April 2nd 2018, 4:32 pm

the first shot at the battle of new orleans was 215 yards and the ball when through the young officers head by his ear. when you can do that with anyway you figure out to shoot your round ball gun then you are as good as they were back then. now no got closer than 98 yards to the rifled small bore shooters that day. most were dropped with head shots. 3400 dead brits and only 9 americans. most of those was a night before ambush. i dont think they worried about the time it took to reload, they just reloaded the right way. deep grooves and linen patches cut off at the muzzle.
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PostSubject: Re: A question from Facebook user   April 2nd 2018, 6:26 pm

A popular tale we all know. Some believe it never happened. Most believe it was a lucky shot.

If it was skill. More of them would have been in history.

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Clyde



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PostSubject: Re: A question from Facebook user   April 14th 2018, 2:38 pm

The British Rifles in the wars of the early 1800 didn't carry two sizes of ammunition however they were taught to load with patch but also to load without the patch when the rifle became clogged or the enemy got to close.
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Buck Conner
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PostSubject: Re: A question from Facebook user   May 17th 2018, 10:17 am

@strong eagle wrote:
the first shot at the battle of new orleans was 215 yards and the ball when through the young officers head by his ear. when you can do that with anyway you figure out to shoot your round ball gun then you are as good as they were back then. now no got closer than 98 yards to the rifled small bore shooters that day. most were dropped with head shots. 3400 dead brits and only 9 americans. most of those was a night before ambush. i dont think they worried about the time it took to reload, they just reloaded the right way. deep grooves and linen patches cut off at the muzzle.

The longest shot in history before 1900 was a 1/4 of a mile (a few feet one way or the other) during the American Civil War by a Union sniper. A southern General would sit and have his morning coffee by the company mess each morning. The Union sniper watched the General for several days and his routine of movement from a tree stand at a quarter mile. 

The sniper placed one shot with his rifled target rifle muzzleloader in .52 caliber using one of those long scopes of the day at this distance.

As the ball is on its way the Reb General got up and a Reb Captain sat down and died. Talk about poor timing for taking that sitting position ......

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